I'm Sean Padilla. You'll figure out the rest if you keep reading.

25th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Standing on the edge of emeralds and flame. with 25 notes

orchidassassin:

First photo of us living in the same city!

This has been the calmest week of my year so far. <3

orchidassassin:

First photo of us living in the same city!

This has been the calmest week of my year so far. <3

25th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Standing on the edge of emeralds and flame. with 9 notes

orchidassassin:

Both of them getting in some computer time after dinner.

We did play with LEGOs and toy cars for a bit beforehand, haha&#8230;

orchidassassin:

Both of them getting in some computer time after dinner.

We did play with LEGOs and toy cars for a bit beforehand, haha…

25th July 2014

Photo reblogged from (C)Untitled with 28,079 notes

mindofataurus:

This is important to know. As we evolve, so does our external reality.

mindofataurus:

This is important to know. As we evolve, so does our external reality.

Source: mindofataurus

25th July 2014

Post reblogged from In Their Journey Thru Space and Time with 757 notes

brujacore:

I’m really excited about women employing DIY and feminist ethics in hip hop right now. Like punk is def still a thing in my heart but it does not hold a monopoly on DIY culture. I gotta give it up for the young women making beats at home, talking about feminism on their online radio shows and taking over stages in cat ears with their friends. Cheers to barftroop and princessnokia and trillwavefeminism for inspiring me this week.

Source: brujacore

25th July 2014

Quote reblogged from In Their Journey Thru Space and Time with 38,310 notes

And how hard is it to land even a minimum-wage job? This year, the Ivy League college admissions acceptance rate was 8.9%. Last year, when Walmart opened its first store in Washington, D.C., there were more than 23,000 applications for 600 jobs, which resulted in an acceptance rate of 2.6%, making the big box store about twice as selective as Harvard and five times as choosy as Cornell. Telling unemployed people to get off their couches (or out of the cars they live in or the shelters where they sleep) and get a job makes as much sense as telling them to go study at Harvard.

Source: commondreams.org

25th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from ♩☎ ☆ ▼ ♧ with 6,990 notes

redkuba:

the-goddamazon:

dynastylnoire:

getrightdowntoit:

The #TIMEtitles Twitter response to Time Magazine’s in depth look at the term (“of endearment”), “bae” has me rollin’…

Sauce:
http://time.com/3026192/this-is-what-bae-means/

dragggggggg

I need help I can’t breathe!

Ahaa I love it when this happens

Source: whenyougetrightdowntoit

25th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from ♩☎ ☆ ▼ ♧ with 6,990 notes

redkuba:

the-goddamazon:

dynastylnoire:

getrightdowntoit:

The #TIMEtitles Twitter response to Time Magazine’s in depth look at the term (“of endearment”), “bae” has me rollin’…

Sauce:
http://time.com/3026192/this-is-what-bae-means/

dragggggggg

I need help I can’t breathe!

Ahaa I love it when this happens

Source: whenyougetrightdowntoit

25th July 2014

Post reblogged from In Their Journey Thru Space and Time with 215 notes

The Importance of Progressive Sitcoms

watchtheswitch:

I watch a lot of sitcoms. Lately I’ve been feeling like I’ve run out of good shows to watch. I’ve exhausted the options on Canadian Netflix.

Sitcoms are part of my wind-down bedtime routine, and I’m a little lost without them. So I’m hunting for anything that’s even tolerable to watch. But as a trans person with radical politics, tolerable is hard to find.

There’s this moment that I’m always bracing myself for when I watch sitcoms. The moment when the writers first punch me in the stomach with a transphobic joke. It’s usually a trans-misogynistic joke about sex workers.

I recently went back to The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air and started watching from the beginning. The show makes it to episode 19 before putting a man in a dress as an object of ridicule. Feeling gross, I stop watching the show. I return to The Mindy Project, which I’d stopped watching at S2E2 because of some horrible jokes about consent. I decide to give it one more chance. I get two episodes farther before a joke centres around de-gendering a sex worker and laughing at her because she’s trans. I quit another show, feeling gross. I’ve quit at least a dozen sitcoms because of their dehumanizing transphobia.

image

(Pictured: The Fresh Prince, dabbling in trans-misogynist jokes.)

It’s not just transphobia, though - sitcoms are full of regressive writing. They kick down more often than they punch up. Sitcoms are too often a landscape full of misogyny, racism, ableism, classism, and other garbage.

So why keep watching? Why not abandon the genre altogether? Well, for starters, because The Wire doesn’t help me fall asleep.

But beyond that, I think there is something important about sitcoms and other television comedies. They are amazingly well-positioned to both normalize things and make other things absurd. Brooklyn Nine Nine is an excellent example of this - Raymond Holt is a strong, gay, Black commanding officer. He’s competent and no-nonsense. The fact that he’s a gay captain is normalized. What the show points its absurdity spotlight on, however, is how Jake Peralta’s stereotypes about LGBT identities are so narrow and reductive. Similarly, the show normalizes having a racially diverse working environment. What it often shines its absurdity spotlight on, however, is the white privilege carried by some of its characters.

image

(Pictured: the cast of Brooklyn Nine Nine.)

Comedy brings levity to difficult issues, and in doing so can make them more accessible to explore and deconstruct. But it’s a tool to be used thoughtfully. It can punch up at oppressive structures or kick down at the people who are already hurting the most.

The world needs more progressive sitcoms. The world needs shows willing to normalize human diversity and call out the absurdity of oppressive ideas. The world needs more laughter that is life-affirming rather than life-demeaning.

That’s why I’m excited about working on The Switch. It’s a show written by trans people about the diversity of transgender experiences. It touches upon sex work, employment discrimination, housing crises, dating fears, race, and more. It normalizes transgender protagonists while shining a spotlight on the absurdity that trans people have to navigate in their daily lives.

I think the show is really important. I hope you’ll check it out and support it. It’s on Kickstarter until August 8.

image

(Pictured: The Switch.)

Source: watchtheswitch

25th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from BRoKEY McPoVERTY with 1,754 notes

brokeymcpoverty:

8 Musicals That Don’t Exist But Totally Should

:)

25th July 2014

Post reblogged from i am a person! with 93 notes

navigatethestream:

one of the movers saw the palestine poster i have in my bedroom and started telling me how pissed off he was about it

as i was listening i thought “see this is what i mean when i say non-black folks aren’t around when black folk talk amongst ourselves. cause he broke down Israel’s contradictions as he was lifting my boxes. all i did was nod like ‘you aint neva lied’!”

people can say black folks are not talking about Palestine enough

but i’ll keep stipulating yr not just around for the times that we do

fundamentally, non-black folks don’t understand how we disseminate knowledge among the average everyday folk who are not academics or activists

we don’t hold intellectual forums, expensive conferences, ect. we shoot the shit in barber shops, hair salons, corner stores, stoops

i’ve had convos with black folks about politics & the state of things while ordering food, buying soap bars & shea butter, waiting on the train

folks need to recognize that

anywhere blackness is blackness does

Source: navigatethestream